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FIGHTER SPONSORSHIP ADVICE

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Fighter Sponsorship Advice

Alex Wright, Creative Director of Revgear gives us his fighter sponsorship advice. Alex is responsible for much of the fighter sponsorship, so he knows a thing or two when it comes to the topic. Here are his words of wisdom for any fighters looking for sponsorship.

There are three levels to sponsorship. Discounts, equipment endorsement and financial endorsements, which are reserved for the highest level of competitors. The benefits of sponsorship are obvious, as athletes go through equipment much faster than recreational martial artists. This is a cost that adds up quickly, so a brand helping them out, takes a burden off a fighter.

So what does a fighter give back to the brand in return for this? Brands are always looking for content for their website and social channels. So a sponsored athlete has the responsibility to provide them with that in the form of words, images and videos. Feedback is also appreciated, as the brand can continue to develop their product using the advice of a fighter. Mentions on social media are also important. An athlete’s social influence group, regardless of size, are potential customers, so working that network helps the brand out. Finally, putting the brand in contact with your gym owners so that they get gear for that gym will earn you points as a sponsored athlete. A common misconception is that athletes simply wearing a brand’s gear will help the brand make sales. Unless you have millions of followers on social channels, this is simply not true.

DO

Build a relationship with the brand
Use their products before approaching them
Stay in contact and build trust
Send some photographs of you using their equipment
Don’t ask for an endorsement, ask for a discount
Tell them why you want to work with them
Ask them what you can do for them

Tom Billinge Tom is the Editor of Revgear Sports. He has been training in Muay Thai gyms in Thailand and around the world for 20 years and is a fully-qualified instructor. Tom is a Jiu Jitsu blue belt in the Kore gi and 10th Planet no gi systems. He has trained Lethwei in Myanmar, Kushti wrestling in India, boxing throughout Europe, and catch wrestling in the USA. Tom has spent several years reconstructing the techniques of traditional British bareknuckle pugilism from archaic manuals.

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